Doing Orange-Peel Texture With A Roller

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TOOLS & MATERIALS

  • Stepladder or scaffolding, as required
  • Water
  • Bucket of joint compound, half full
  • Mixer or mixing stick
  • 1/2 inch nap roller
  • Roller Pan
  • Test scrap of drywall, approximately 2 x 2 feet
  • 18 to 24 inch straighedge or finishing knife

You can apply a textured finish using an airless paint sprayers, but there are a number of hand applied textures that will give you a professional-looking finish. For example, to achieve an orange-peel finish without a sprayer, simply use a paint roller to apply watered-down joint compound.

If the roller produces the texture you want, allow it to dry as is. How ever, you may have touble getting a good orange-peel effect using this approach, especially on inside corners (though this can be achieved with practice and patience). If this is the case, try knocking down the half-dry surface. This usually improves the appearance of this texture, making it more consistent with an orange-peel look.

You can apply a textured finish using an airless paint sprayers, but there are a number of hand applied textures that will give you a professional-looking finish. For example, to achieve an orange-peel finish without a sprayer, simply use a paint roller to apply watered-down joint compound.

If the roller produces the texture you want, allow it to dry as is. How ever, you may have touble getting a good orange-peel effect using this approach, especially on inside corners (though this can be achieved with practice and patience). If this is the case, try knocking down the half-dry surface. This usually improves the appearance of this texture, making it more consistent with an orange-peel look.

orange peel roller

1. Thin joint compound. Choose a bucket of joint compound that is at least half full, but not one that is brand-new and filled to the top. Add some water to the bucket of joint compound – you'll need enough to make it spreadable with a roller but not runny.
2. Mix the thinned compound. Using a hand-mixer or a mixing paddle chucked into an electric drill, or by hand, mix the water and joint compound until its consistency matches that of paint or heavy cream. If it seems that the mud is toothick, just add a little water, and if its too runny, jusst add some straight mud and mix again.
3. Check the mixture's consistency. Poor some of the mixture into a roller pan, Using a roller, apply it to a piece of scrap drywall held upright. The mixture should not sag or run. If it runs, add more joint compound; if it turns out to be too thick to roll, add more water.
4. Roll a first coat onto the wall. Using the 1/2 inch nap roller, apply the mixture to the wall. Roll it as you would roll on paint, covering every square inch of the wall. Get as close to the corners and edges as possible. Allow this application to dry for 10 minutes or until it loses its shine.
5. Roll on a second coat. After the first coat has dried, roll on a second coat. Work the roller over the surface until you achieve the desired effect. Make sure that you're satisfied with it because you should'nt touch the wall again except to paint it. Wash out the roller with water. Cap the joint-compound bucket, and then date it and label it "orange peel" so you don't mistake it for standard joint compound on future projects.
Knockdown the finish. As an alternative you can modify orange-peel texture to give it a knocked-down look. Holding an 18-inch to 24-inch taping knife almost flat to the ceiling or wall and draw it across the half-dry orange-peel finish, applying extremly light pressure. Check your work as you go because the finish you leave will be the final look. You can vary the finish by applying more or less pressure.